Bank Holiday Weathering

Things have been a bit quiet here, but that’s not to say things haven’t been happening, I’ve been busy building baseboards for my new project and this has been taking up most of my modelling time – they will be the subject of a future blog post.

The recent long weekend provided an opportunity to get some more work done on those baseboards,and also get a couple of projects that have been waiting on the workbench weathered and finished off.

To get things started, a nice straightforward backdating of Bachmann’s 37038 to 6781 – simply renumbering, adding headcode blinds in place of the dominoes and adding screw links/ bufferbeam pipes…

As with all my Bachmann class 37’s, the model has also been lowered by around 1mm by modifying the bogie tower slightly – this helps convey the weight and presence of the real loco far better than the factory effort in my opinion.

Next up is a bit of a hybrid – a Vitrains 37 that has been in my loco box for years, and really needed sorting out. I’ve backdated by cutting out the headcode boxes and adding the buffer beam cowels. Replacement buffers are from the Lanarkshire range.

It’s not perfect, and is missing the boiler port, but it has come out miles better than I ever expected – again the body has been lowered a bit, this time by adjusting some of the fixing clips.

Not one that’s been sat around for ages, but a bit of a rescue job, is this Hornby 31 – purchased cheaply as a non runner. The cause of this issue turned out to be the large hole where the motor should be and it turned out to be a simple fix costing less than £20. The body was however in a weathered finish applied by Hornby – you know the flat brown spray they used to apply when weathering was the new thing to do…..

Having removed most of the factory weathering with polish, I added the characteristic bodyside strip using some Microstrip, and cut a representation of the nose doors into the Hornby ends (which were based on ones plated over). Then it was more of the same as above, pipes and screw links on the bufferbeams and then weathering.

These can now migrate to the loco box and make space for the next couple of rolling stock projects required to fill the new fiddle yard, which is considerably larger than those we are used to!

Chris

2 Replies to “Bank Holiday Weathering”

  1. Love your work Chris and those locos are no exception! The weathering is superb. How did you do it? the roof and top of the noses on the 37’s are spot on, exactly how I remember them, they always had a layer of filth covering them.
    Great stuff!

    Steve.

    1. Thanks Steve, that’s very kind of you! I always use Tamiya acrylics, and usually mix a pot thinned about 50/50 and one at original thickness.

      These days I like to brush on the thinned paint around the detail and grilles on the bodyside, then take this back off with thinners and a cotton bud. Once done I use the thick paint to infill all the grilled, before moving on to the airbrush and the thinned paint – I generally cover the roof with this, and then also blow a bit along the lower body sides to simulate track dirt…. both of those allow a little paint to drift onto the body sides and blend everything together, but not enough to completely cover them (in theory!)

      It’s worth noting that I’m modelling a winter scene, so tend to use dark colours on the underframe and the lower body side – in summer I think there would be a bit more brown involved to simulate the dust you get then, and the locos would probably be a bit cleaner overall!

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